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  • Project Mirfield questions on Thursday regarding the £1.2 million project to reduce the risk of internal sewer flooding to over a dozen local homes.

    By pmadmin
    Dec 30th, 2014
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    Project Mirfield questions on Thursday regarding the £1.2 million project to reduce the risk of internal sewer flooding to over a dozen local homes.

    • How long as Yorkshire Water known about the problem of flooding on old bank road.
    • What is the life time expectancy of the tank.
    • How many pumps to be installed to the wet-well and what happens if they fail.
    • How may house will the new tank service for foul discharge please name all roads in full answer.
    • How many square meter of storm water area will discharge in to the tank, roads, paths, drives, house roofs, garage roofs please name all roads in full answer. If the highways gullies and drainage system connect in to the tank indirectly via Yorkshire water drains please state number of gullies and road names.
    • How many LT per second will the pumps, discharge back in to the existing drain in old bank road?
    • What is the diameter of the pipe and what is its total capacity before the drains hydraulics fail, and the current fall of the drain from man hole to man hole start from upstream and end at downstream.
    •  Is the tank deigned for a 1-100 years worst storm plus 30%.
    • Please state what would happen if the tank was near full to capacity with one storm then a second storm hit within minutes of the first storm of the same magnitude.
    • Could the car park ever flood, or be expected to flood directly from this deigned scheme.
    • Other than installing the new tank, is there another alternative?.

    See full scheme.

    The understanding of the drainage systems of Mirfield is vital to the core plan of the town combining foul waste water, and storm water is bad practice, and to rely on electric pumps to pump storm water will also prove to be a mistake.

    The mistakes of our past as now caught up the decommissioning of the old culverts which once serviced our surface water runoff are now depleted just a couple left in use the few what are left are badly maintained and are now nearly over capacity over the last 30 years Yorkshire water connected the surface water runoff in to their combined systems which means foul water and storm water drain to the sewage treatments works.

    The (LLFA) lead local flood authority = KMC state in Kirklees local flood risk management strategy on page 11. DG5 Properties which are at risk of sewer flooding more frequently than once in 20 years, on page 18 of the Kirklees local flood risk management strategy

    Yorkshire Water owns much of the combined and surface water sewers in the region. Sewer systems are currently designed not to flood in a 1:30 year return period design storm. This does not include accommodating flows from exceptional and high magnitude rainfall events. During extremely wet weather, the rainfall may exceed current design criteria. 

    Project Mirfield implemented the questions above to be put forward on Thursday at the Yorkshire water drop-in regarding the £1.2 million project to reduce the risk of internal sewer flooding to over a dozen local homes in Mirfield.

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