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  • Where are we now, seven years on, from the floods of 2007? We have all been told to adapt to climate change – we are willing, but are the authorities willing to pay?

    By pmadmin
    In Local to Mirfield
    Jun 1st, 2014
    0 Comments
    12856 Views

    We have all been told to adapt to climate change –  we are willing, but are the authorities willing to pay?

    You would say with what happened in 2007 and 2012 floods Kirklees M.C.  would dredge the River Calder, raise the banks and allocate an area to form a flood plain; this would eradicate the surcharge of culverts and drains surcharging the drainage infrastructure. Yorkshire Water – what have they done to mitigate the flood problem in the town? Nothing! Mirfield’s watercourse and sewer systems are now out of date by 35 years; some go right back to the Victorian times, but yet they keep on adding water to the system.

    The evidence over the last 35 years, with the large and small developments in the town and the outrageous lack of spending on our drainage system by Yorkshire Water, together with the unacceptable amount of flood defense works to the River Calder,  all point to one thing – more flooding in our town!

    The NPPF recommends all drainage systems should allow for an extra 20 %  to offset climate change to any new drainage system- how does this fit in with the old drainage system? It does not! We now should be looking at allowing 50% to offset climate change to give the next generation a chance that would be sustainable. Extra 20% offset climate change means to design a drainage system to allow for 1 in 100 years storm, and add an extra 20% capacity to the system

    Please view the video

    river 2007

    Water gushed from the River Calder in Mirfield forcing drivers to take alternative routes. Police closed Steanard Lane following the torrential downpour early on Thursday morning which caused the river to break its banks. A flood warning was made by British Waterways during the morning rush hour. Drivers who braved the rain risked the road until it was closed at around 10am and cars were diverted through Hopton.

    Old Bank Primary School, in Old Bank Road, Mirfield.,  2 inch of water in the nursery area. Homes in Ravensthorpe and Chickenley have been devastated by floodwater for the second time in just over a week. Victoria Street – cellars and garages were fast filling up with water. The area has had problems before, but it seems to have got a lot worse since they built the new houses nearby.  Kirklees Council said the floods were down to drains backing up – but they would investigate claims that the Ravensthorpe housing development was adding to the problem. Syke Ing Close, Chickenley; the house was under a foot of water. Granny Lane and Steanard Lane in Mirfield had been closed, as well as Moor Lane in Gomersal, Drubb Lane in Cleckheaton, Halifax Road in Liversedge and Union Road, Liversedge. Train lines between Huddersfield and Leeds were closed.

    This information is taken from the environment agency website follow link

    River Calder at Ledgard Bridge

    The typical river level range for this location is between 0.00 metres and 2.50 metres. The highest river level recorded at this location is 5.10 metres and the river level reached 4.63 metres on 06/07/2012

    This information is taken from the environment agency website follow link

    River Calder at Heaton Lodge

    The typical river level range for this location is between 0.20 metres and 1.20 metres. The highest river level recorded at this location is 3.08 metres and the river level reached 2.53 metres on 06/07/2012.

    Kirklees Surface Water Management Plan 2011

    14.2.13 – Kirklees Surface Management plan 2011 (SWMP) (Ref. 14.16 ) states the following about surface water flooding within the area.

    The large settlements to the centre and north of the district. Huddersfield, Dewsbury and Batley, have significant networks of public sewers owned and maintained by Yorkshire water, with less evidence of smaller culvert watercourses remaining in those areas. It is likely that the traditional means of draining surface water via watercourses has been gradually replaced by the developing public sewer system carrying rainwater in both surface water and combined sewer.

    14.2.14 – the historical flooding database compiled for the SWMP identifies Mirfield as a :HOTSPOT: of surface water flooding during the June 2007 flooding.

    The 2007 floods flooded up to an estimated 500 properties across the district and were described by many residents as the’ worst in living memory’. The flooding was widespread across the district but ‘hotspots’ occurred around Ravensthorpe, Liversedge, Cleckheaton, Chickenley, Mirfield, Milnsbridge, Brockholes, New Mill, Denby Dale, Scissett, and Clayton West.

    Few watercourses in Kirklees breached their banks during the 2007 floods, but many surface water outfalls were submerged, restricted or had the inability to have a free discharge, which resulted in the surcharge of highway drains. Yorkshire Water surface water sewers and combined sewers were exceeded which exacerbated the problem with combined sewer overflows (CSO’s) operating and sewage mixing with floodwater.

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